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Posts Tagged ‘visualization’

Day 1 Proper of the conference began with acknowledgements to the organisers, some kind of raffle draw and then a plenary address by an American radio journalist.  Altogether this conference has a celebratory feel to it – fitting since this is SAA’s 75th Anniversary year, but very different in tone from the UK conferences where the opening keynote speaker tends to be some archival luminary.  More on the American archival cultural experience later.

My session with Kate Theimer (of ArchivesNext fame) and Dr Elizabeth Yakel from the University of Michigan (probably best known amongst tech savvy UK practitioners for her work on the Polar Bear Expedition Finding Aid) followed immediately afterwards, and seemed to go well.  The session title was: “What Happens After ‘Here Comes Everybody’: An Examination of Participatory Archives”.  Kate proposed a new definition for Participatory Archives, distinguishing between participation and engagement (outreach); Beth spoke about credibility and trust, and my contribution was primarily concerned with contributors’ motivations to participate.  A couple of people, Lori Satter and Mimi Dionne have already blogged about the session (did I really say that?!), and here are my slides:

After lunch, I indulged in a little session-hopping, beginning in session 204 hearing about Jean Dryden’s copyright survey of American institutions, which asked whether copyright limits access to archives by restricting digitisation activity.  Dryden found that American archivists tended to take a very conservative approach to copyright expiry terms and obtaining third party permission for use, even though many interviewees felt that it would be good to take a bolder line.   Also, some archivists knowledge of the American copyright law was shaky – sounds familiar!  It would be interesting to see how UK attitudes would compare; I suspect results would be similar, however, I also wonder how easy it is in practical terms to suddenly start taking more of a risk-management approach to copyright after many years of insisting upon strict copyright compliance.

Next I switched to session 207, The Future is Now: New Tools to Address Archival Challenges, hearing Maria Esteva speak about some interesting collaborative work between the Texas Advanced Computing Center and NARA on visual finding aids, similar to the Australian Visible Archive research project. At the Exhibit Hall later, I picked up some leaflets about other NARA Applied Research projects and tools for file format conversion, data mining and record type identification which were discussed by other speakers in this session.

Continuing the digitization theme, although with a much more philosophical focus, Joan Schwartz in session 210, Genuine Encounter, Authentic Relationships: Archival Convenant & Professional Self-Understanding discussed the loss of materiality and context resulting from the digitisation of photographs (for example, a thumbnail image presented out of its album context).  She commented that archivists are often too caught up with the ‘how’ of digitization rather than the ‘why’.  I wouldn’t disagree with that.

Back to the American archival cultural experience, I was invited to the Michigan University ‘alumni mixer’ in the evening – a drinks reception with some short speeches updating alumni on staff news and recent developments in the archival education courses at the university.  All in all, archives students are much in evidence here: there are special student ‘ribbons’ to attach to name badges, many students are presenting posters on their work, and there is a special careers area where face-to-face advice is available from more senior members of SAA, current job postings are advertised, and new members of the profession can even pin up their curriculum vitae.  Some of this (the public posting of CVs in particular) might seem a bit pushy for UK tastes, and the one year length of UK Masters programmes (and the timing of Conference) of course precludes the presentation of student dissertation work.  But the general atmosphere seems very supportive of new entrants to the profession, and I feel there are ideas here that ARA’s New Professionals section might like to consider for future ARA Conferences.

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Day 3 of ECDL started for me with the Query Log Analysis session.  I thought perhaps that, now the papers were getting heavily into IR technicalities, I might not understand what was being presented or that it would be less relevant to archives.  How wrong can you be!  Well, ok, IR metrics are complex, especially for someone new to the field, but when the first presentation was based upon a usability study of the EAD finding aids at the Nationaal Archief (the National Archives of the Netherlands), it wasn’t too difficult to spot the relevance.  In fact, it was interesting to see how you notice things when the test data is presented in a foreign language, that you wouldn’t necessarily observe if they were in your mother tongue.  In the case of the Nationaal Archief, I was horrified at how many clicks were required to reach an item description.  Most archives have this problem with web-based finding aids (unless they merely replicate a traditional format, for instance, a PDF copy of a paper list), but somehow it was so much more obvious when I wasn’t quite sure exactly what was being presented to me at each stage of the results.  This is what it must be like to be an archival novice.  No wonder they give up.

The second paper of the morning, Determining Time of Queries for Re-ranking Search Results, was also very pertinent to searching in an archival context.  It discussed ‘temporal documents’ where either the terminology itself has changed over time or time is highly relevant to the query.  This temporal intent may be either implicit or explicit in the query.  For example, ‘tsunami + Thailand’ is likely to refer to the 2004 tsunami.  These kinds of issues are obviously very important for historians, and for archivists making temporal collections available in a web environment, such as web archives and online archival finding aids.

Later in the morning, I was down to attend the stream on Domain-specific Digital Libraries.  One of these specific domains turned out to be archives, with an (appropriately) very philosophical paper presented by Pierre-Edouard Portier about DINAH [in French].  This is “a philological platform for the construction of multi-structured documents”, created to enable the transcription and annotation of the papes of the French philosopher, Jean-Toussaint Desanti, and to facilitate the visualization of the trace of user activities.  My tweeting of this paper (limited on account of both the presentation’s intellectual and technical complexity and the fact that I’d got to bed at around 3am that morning!) seemed to catch the attention of both the archival profession and the Linked Data community;  it certainly deserves some further coverage in the English-speaking archival professional literature.

In the same session, I was also interested in the visualization techniques presented for time-oriented scientific data by Jürgen Bernard, which reminded me of The Visible Archive research project funded by the National Archives of Australia.  The principle – that visual presentations are a useful, possibly preferable, alternative to text-based descriptions of huge series of data – is the same in both cases.  Similarly, the PROBADO project has investigated the development of tools to store and retrieve complex, non-textual data and objects, such as 3D CAD drawings and music.  There were important implications from all of these papers for the future development of archival finding aids.

In the afternoon, I found myself helping out at the Networked Knowledge Organization Systems/Services (NKOS) workshop.  I wasn’t really sure what this entailed, but it turned out to involve things like thesauri construction and semantic mapping between systems, all of which is very relevant to the UK Archives Discovery (UKAD) Network objectives.  I was particularly sorry I was unable to make the Friday session of the workshop, which was to be all about user-centred knowledge system design, and Linked Data, however the slides are all available with the programme for the workshop.

Once again, my sincere thanks to the conference organisers for my opportunity to participate in ECDL2010.  The conference proceedings are available from Springer, for those who want to follow up further, and presentation slides are gradually appearing on the conference website.

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