Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Cultural Challenges’

I hinted in the post below that there might be some changes coming up on this blog.  This is because, as some of you will already know, I have moved on from West Yorkshire Archive Service, to start a PhD jointly supervised by UCL’s Department of Information Studies and The National Archives provisionally entitled ‘We Think, Not I think: Harnessing collaborative creativity to archival practice; implications of user participation for archival theory and practice‘.

This means that my interests are expanding beyond the original focus of Around the World in Eighty Gigabytes, which I originally set up to document my own voyages of discovery about digital preservation and how international initiatives in this field might be scaled down to apply within the small archives settings with which I was most familiar.  I have umm-ed and ah-ed for a bit about what I should do now – start a new blog or morph this one to cover aspects of user participation?  In the end, I have decided to continue with 80GB.  There are various reasons for this:

  • There are several common strands between digital preservation research and my current interests in user collaboration – they both relate to the impact of digital technologies on archival theory and practice, and many of the major issues (eg authority, context, trust, the cultural challenges of embedding technological change in operational settings) are debated in both areas of research.  I had been thinking that these common themes would make for a good posting on Ada Lovelace day, but I didn’t, er, quite get round to it!
  • I haven’t stopped being interested in digital preservation, or in the impact of digital technology on smaller archives, and I will continue to post on both themes when opportunities arise.
  • I want a space to express my own personal opinions on things which interest me and to explore ideas.  What I post here will not represent the views of The National Archives or UCL any more than my previous postings represented the official stance of West Yorkshire Archive Service.
  • I flatter myself to think there are a few people who read my ramblings, and know me as 80GB.  If they are interested in digital preservation and small archives, and are into following obscure blogs, I suspect they may be interested in reading about the implications of social media on archives too.
  • Putting everything together should mean that I actually update the blog rather more regularly.
  • To be blunt, there are a few events coming up that I think I will want to write about, and I can’t be bothered to set up a new blog…

However, if either of my current readers thinks that this is a really bad idea, they should please let me know in the comments…

Read Full Post »

On Monday I attended an event at the British Library – Digital Researcher: Managing your networks and building your profile.  I hadn’t intended to blog about it here, since the subject seemed somewhat tangential to the focus of this blog (or at least to the focus of this blog hitherto – on which more, possibly, later).

However, about halfway through the day it suddenly struck me that the communities I know best – archives, digital curation, libraries – appear to be well ahead of the crowd when it comes to using social media and exploiting the best of web2.0.  There was an enthusiastic response to Adrian Arthur’s presentation on current work at the British Library, which highlighted several archives initiatives, including @PeggyRamsay and user collaboration features in the Sound Archive, such as tagging, adding metadata and the google maps mashup.  “Cool stuff” said the tweeters in the room (despite the dodgy wifi), “sounds great” thought several of my followers, as I was re-tweeted across in the U.S. and in Australia.  Later in the day, the discussion moved on to the pros and cons of using institutional repositories, and there was even a question on how to cite a tweet, with a response pointing to JISC PoWR.  There is a twapperkeeper archive of #DR10 tweets at http://twapperkeeper.com/dr10, if you want to explore further, and some (not yet all – hopefully that’ll be fixed soon) slides are available on the Vitae website.

[Edit: to say that all the slides are now available at http://www.vitae.ac.uk/dr10]

Much of my early dabbling with social media platforms was prompted by my interest in digital preservation:  I finally caved in and joined facebook when a group was established following the DELOS Summer School I attended in 2008.  I started this blog to document my journeys around digital archives in Australia and the USA on my Winston Churchill Memorial Trust Fellowship.  I joined twitter to enable me to keep up with conferences across the world on the subject of digital curation, that I couldn’t get to, and to follow digital preservation people, that I wouldn’t dare talk to (then!).  The purpose of a feed reader finally became evident to me when the number of people blogging about things which interested me grew to such proportions that I could no longer keep up by visiting favourite websites.  Just this morning (as a result of #DR10), I have registered for FriendFeed, and discover – surprise, surprise – that most of the digital curation community are already there.

Until Monday, I suppose I took most of this activity for granted.  The open ethos which informs much code development in the digital curation field also pervades its scholarship, so that I, an ordinary archivist working for an average county record service in the north of England, could grasp the opportunity not only to find out about the latest research in the field, but also to engage in a dialogue with many of its leading figures.  Only on a few occasions can I remember encountering some peer-reviewed, subscription journal wall I could not find a way to circumnavigate.  The same is broadly true of the wider archives and library communities, and for my current research interest in user collaboration – the best example I can think of here would be the Smithsonian’s experiences with Flickr, which were published as an article in Archival Science, but also made available as a pre-print in the Smithsonian’s own research repository.

I guess I just assumed that this was how academia worked in the modern world.  But it seems that sometimes it isn’t.  Nor are my own communities of practice entirely immune to attacks of scepticism about what has been called the democratisation of knowledge production.

But the next time somebody opines in my hearing (as happened to me only last week) that libraries and archives “haven’t really got to grips with the virtual world”, I’ll be asking them what an RSS feed is.

Read Full Post »

A couple of articles in the most recent edition of the International Journal of Digital Curation caught my eye this week as I prepare for my forthcoming Winston Churchill Memorial Fellowship to Australia and the US.

Martha Anderson reviews the evolution of the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program initiated by the Library of Congress, and draws some conclusions about lessons learned, many of which will be familiar to those of us working within existing partnership organisations, such as West Yorkshire Joint Services. The layered stewardship model introduced in the paper is nevertheless a useful concept to bear in mind as the UK archive sector begins to build our own national network of diverse stakeholders to tackle the digital preservation challenge. The full paper is available at http://www.ijdc.net/ijdc/article/view/59/60.

David Pearson and Colin Webb discuss issues of file format obsolescence and introduce the AONS II Project, something I hope to find out more about when I visit the National Library of Australia in September. The project aimed to develop a software tool that would find and report indicators of obsolescence risks. It will be interesting to see how this works fits with European Planets Project and their PLATO preservation planning tool. The IJDC paper can be found at http://www.ijdc.net/ijdc/article/view/76/78.

I see more papers have appeared on the PeDALS project website in Arizona too – plenty of reading to get through…

Read Full Post »

At the DELOS Summer School on Preservation in Digital Libraries, which so far more than lives up to my expectation that it will provide an excellent overview of current and emerging digital preservation research and practices.

A comforting thought for local government Archive Services from the presentations on day 1:

  • that digital preservation is as much about organisational and cultural challenges as technical ones. Something we can all start to address – now.

And also a rather more concerning one:

  • the emphasis in OAIS on serving a designated community, something which is in any case hard to determine for traditional record offices with geographically defined collection policies. Priscilla Caplan also points out that the OAIS requirement that material preserved in an archival system should remain understandable to that community has not usually been part of the mandate of ordinary libraries or archives.

Read Full Post »